SIGPLAN Blog: Making PL Ideas Accessible

I have a new post up on the SIGPLAN blog: “Making PL Ideas Accessible: An Open-Source, Open-Access, Interactive Journal. Inspired by Distill, I propose an open-access, open-source, interactive journal for disseminating clear presentations of current ideas and methods in programming languages.

It’s a particularly good moment to consider our research’s reach and impact: CORE has just downgraded many PL conferences in its rankings. Just because you don’t take an interest in rankings doesn’t mean rankings won’t take an interest in you. Let this spur a new wave of beautiful and enlightening explanations of PL ideas that can reach a a broad audience.

The Dynamic Practice and Static Theory of Gradual Typing

I’ll be presenting my thoughts on the state of gradual typing research—along with some goals and challenges—at SNAPL 2019. Here’s the abstract of my paper, The Dynamic Practice and Static Theory of Gradual Typing:

We can tease apart the research on gradual types into two ‘lineages’: a pragmatic, implementation-oriented dynamic-first lineage and a formal, type-theoretic, static-first lineage. The dynamic-first lineage’s focus is on taming particular idioms—‘pre-existing conditions’ in untyped programming languages. The static-first lineage’s focus is on interoperation and individual type system features, rather than the collection of features found in any particular language. Both appear in programming languages research under the name “gradual typing”, and they are in active conversation with each other.

What are these two lineages? What challenges and opportunities await the static-first lineage? What progress has been made so far?

See you in Providence?