PLVNET

I’m really happy to be part of the first PLVNET, a workshop on the intersection of PL, verification, and networking. I have two abstracts up for discussion.

The first abstract, Temporal NetKAT, is about adding reasoning about packet histories to a network policy language like NetKAT. The work on this is moving along quite nicely (thanks in large part to Ryan Beckett!), and I’m looking forward to the conversations it will spark.

The second abstract, Type systems for SDN controllers, is about using type systems to statically guarantee the absence of errors in controller programs. Fancy new switches have tons of features, which can be tricky to operate—can we make sure that a controller doesn’t make any mistakes when it talks to a switch? Some things are easy, like making sure that the match/action rules are sent to tables that can handle them; some things are harder, like making sure the controller doesn’t fill up a switch’s tables. I think this kind of work is a nice complement to the NetKAT “whole policy” approach, a sort of OpenFlow 1.3+ version of VeriCon with slightly different goals.

Should be fun!

Concurrent NetCore: From Policies to Pipelines

Cole Schlesinger, Dave Walker, and I submitted a paper to ICFP 2014. It’s called Concurrent NetCore: From Policies to Pipelines. Here’s the abstract:

In a Software-Defined Network (SDN), a central, computationally powerful controller manages a set of distributed, computationally simple switches. The controller computes a policy describing how each switch should route packets and populates packet-processing tables on each switch with rules to enact the routing policy. As network conditions change, the controller continues to add and remove rules from switches to adjust the policy as needed.

Recently, the SDN landscape has begun to change as several proposals for new, reconfigurable switching architectures, such as RMT and FlexPipe have emerged. These platforms provide switch programmers with many, flexible tables for storing packet-processing rules, and they offer programmers control over the packet fields that each table can analyze and act on. These reconfigurable switch architectures support a richer SDN model in which a switch configuration phase precedes the rule population phase. In the configuration phase, the controller sends the switch a graph describing the layout and capabilities of the packet processing tables it will require during the population phase. Armed with this foreknowledge, the switch can allocate its hardware (or software) resources more efficiently.

We present a new, typed language, called Concurrent NetCore, for specifying routing policies and graphs of packet-processing tables. Concurrent NetCore includes features for specifying sequential, conditional and concurrent control-flow between packet- processing tables. We develop a fine-grained operational model for the language and prove this model coincides with a higher level denotational model when programs are well typed. We also prove several additional properties of well typed programs, including strong normalization and determinism. To illustrate the utility of the language, we develop linguistic models of both the RMT and FlexPipe architectures and we give a multi-pass compilation algorithm that translates graphs and routing policies to the RMT model.

A Balance of Power: Expressive, Analyzable Controller Programming

I just finished reading A Balance of Power: Expressive, Analyzable Controller Programming. It’s an interesting proposal, but I’m writing just to express my satisfaction with the following sentence:

When we hit expressive limits, however, our goal is not to keep growing this language—down that path lies sendmail.cf and other sulphurous designs—but to call out to full-language code.

‘Sulphurous’ indeed. Come for the nonmonotonic interpretation of learning, stay for the colorful prose.